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Mama Say Make I Dey Go, She Dey My Back
Mama Say Make I Dey Go, She Dey My Back

Jelili Atiku, Damian Christinger

Venice, Lagos, and the Spaces in between

Wandering down the Riva S. Biasio I gaze at the superyachts, thronged at the quay, and the African street vendors selling cheap knock-off handbags: poor immigrants trying to make a living contrasted with the absurdly wealthy visiting one of the great gatherings of the globalized art world. This image has become a sort of a cliché, especially during the last edition of the Biennale di Venezia, curated by Okwui Enwezor, with its emphasis on art from the global South and...
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  • Africa
  • body
  • feminism
  • colonialism
  • performance
News + Events

Dauerausstellung »Gesichtsüberwachungsschnecken« von Yves Netzhammer

05.09.2017 – 05.09.2018

U-Bahn-Station Altes Landgut (U1)
1100 Wien
Österreich

Storming of the Winter Palace: History as Theater

23.09.2017 – 25.10.2017

Gessnerallee Zürich
Gessnerallee 8
8001 Zürich
Schweiz

Straub/Huillet: Tell it to the Stones

13.09.2017 – 19.11.2017

Akademie der Künste
Hanseatenweg 10
10557 Berlin
Deutschland

New releases
Kerstin Stakemeier (ed.), Susanne Witzgall (ed.): The Present of the Future

 

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Current Texts

Diana Coole

New Materialism

Over the past two or three years there has been much talk in the social and human sciences about a materialist turn. It is clear that this is not, however, a complete revolution back to older forms of materialism, even if some of their traces are still resonant. The new materialists are self-consciously positioning themselves in the wake of an earlier cultural turn towards linguistic modes of cultural analysis that included radical forms of constructivism, but also in response to new challenges and opportunities that are emerging through novel ways of understanding matter and handling objects.

My essay has two main parts. The first provides an overview by considering some of the ways a new materialism is being pursued, the sources from which it draws inspiration and the kind of vocabulary that is being used to invoke volatile process of materialisation. This includes a sketch of the new materialist ontology, with...

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  • anthropology
  • materialist turn
  • material aesthetics
  • materiality
  • thing/thingness

 

“Every human body is an old civilization”
“Every human body is an old civilization”

Susanne Witzgall

“Every human body is an old civilization”

Susanne Witzgall: One common point in your texts in that both of you describe migration as an incomplete process, as a practice that is not completed with the arrival at the destination, but perhaps even only finds its starting point, its beginning, there. For instance, you Christian Kravagna, have written in your essay that many migrants develop a practice of travelling back and forth, almost like commuting, a process in which there is no definitive home that one can return...
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Current Texts

Diedrich Diederichsen

“is x-ism a y-ism”

The title of this text poses what at first appears to be an irritating, if not completely insane question, that I myself couldn’t have imagined posing a year ago. For one thing, it’s because one of the important terms in this question was totally unknown to me, and for another, I probably would have affirmed it outright had I known what this word meant.

The question is: Is Marxism a correlationism? The rhetoric of this formulation – “is x-ism a y-ism” – borrows from the title of a famous essay by Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism is a Humanism (1946). In those days it was also a matter of setting a new philosophical fashion in relation to a major cornerstone of orientation – to humanism. Today the question appears to be reversed: Is Marxism – which is now the cornerstone, the old orientation – a correlationism? The correlationism isn’t the new fashion, but...

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  • thing/thingness
  • material aesthetics
  • materialist turn
  • materiality
  • anthropology
Current Texts

Stephen Frosh

We are always part of an and and a between.

As it happens, in relation to questions of fragile identities, I think these are very useful words. One issue that has been confronted in recent discussions of identity has been whether it is singular or plural and if the latter, which is the predominant critical view, what kind of plurality is being evoked by the term? Specifically, are we talking about something that is fragmented or something that is multiple? Is the human subject notionally one, but through exposure to forces of various kinds, ranging from the excessive competing demands of post-modernity through to devastating trauma, it becomes a split subject? Or does the multiplicity of selves and identities (to run the terms together for a moment) reflect the simple reality of life – we are multiple beings, and our task is to do something with this multiplicity, not to wish it gone? It is this position that I would...

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  • Hannah Arendt
  • Judith Butler
  • family
  • Judaism
  • identity