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"Curriculum Vitae in Pictures“

Maria Zinfert (ed.)

Kracauer. Photographic Archive

Kracauer. Photographic Archive presents  largely unknown material from the estate of the German-American theorist of film and photography, ­Siegfried Kracauer and his wife and assistant Elisabeth, known as Lili. The single and group portraits, still lifes, street scenes and landscapes collected in this book all come from the estate of Siegfried Kracauer. Published here for the first time, they are an extensive and representative selection from the enlargements, contact sheets and rolls of film originally archived by Lili Kracauer. With...
  • biography
  • 1950s
  • 20th century
  • archive
  • 1930s
Current Texts

Jean-Luc Nancy

Des zétrangers des zah des zuh

Etrange extraneus du dehors pas du dedans (intraneus) pas de la maison unheimlich pas du heim pas du foyer de l’autre côté des portes – fores, foreigner pas dans le rythme en trop, odd pas régulier pas ordinaire rare singulier seltsam bizarre besherat vaillant élégant fantasque tordu verschroben de travers surprenant extraordinaire étonnant

 

C’est étonnant comme nous sommes riches en mots formes façons pour tourner autour de l’étrange étranger de l’ausländer hors du pays pas « pays avec nous » comme on disait jadis en France « c’est un pays à moi » pour dire quelqu’un de mon village de mon coin ma province mon bled

 

Riches à profusion pour tout ce qui n’est pas proche et propre, approprié, convenant, mitmenschlich ce qui ne fait pas mitdasein

 

Parce qu’on présuppose que mit avec with est consistant, plein, solide et solidaire et ce qui est without avecsans mitohne avec hors ou hors d’avec la proximité

 

Mais avec même proche exige...

 

 

Marking the passage from misfortune to good luck
Marking the passage from misfortune to good luck

Elisabeth Bronfen

The Elevator—A Heteropia

An even more strikingly risky moment, which for Don anticipates both a personal and a professional crisis, occurs at the open door of an elevator in the fifth season. After Megan has confessed to him that she wants to stop working at the agency so as to fully concentrate on her acting career, he accompanies her to the elevator, where he takes leave of her by demonstratively giving her a passionate kiss before the door closes. Then, as though this...
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  • Labor
  • architecture
  • 1960s
  • America
  • everyday life
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Andreas L. Hofbauer

The yoke of being, noteworthy dis-position

It wasn’t nature and its dangers that forced domestication and enabled the economic shrine. Temple and funerary cult, sacrifice and distribution of the meat—for Homer all sacrificial animals were still hieria, holy creatures—and the containment of wildness led to symbolic and socio-cultural change, which became the vector and motor of sedentary, food-producing communities. It wasn’t sheep, goats, or cattle that were domesticated first; it was the zoon logon echon itself that bowed to the self-created yoke of the cult. Why, we don’t know. Beyond this it’s important that unlike plants only very few species of animal can be domesticated, and that this shouldn’t be confused with taming. Economic significance develops as an epiphenomenon. It transforms from possible human sacrifice to animal sacrifice to the distribution of meat in early “Greek” antiquity, then to the obeloi (skewers with varying amounts of meat, as tokens for the priests’ or judges’ portion; even...

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  • ethnology
  • economization
  • anthropology
  • money
Current Texts

Marcus Quent

Belief in the world is what we most lack.

It was Gilles Deleuze who in various contexts underlined that what we most lacked was “belief in the world.” The odd remark appears, for example, in a conversation in 1990 with the Italian Marxist Antonio Negri about revolutionary emergence and the political force of minorities. In this dialogue Negri examines his interlocutor’s thought in the light of the “problem of the political,” which connects the various stages of the philosopher’s intellectual biography. Deleuze’s remark here is the reprise of a motif that would be familiar to readers of his second book on cinema, which appeared in 1985, in which Deleuze contends that the “power of modern cinema” is based on its ability to “give us back” our lost “belief in the world.”

At the end of the conversation Negri asks his dialogue partner about the possibility of present-day processes of subjectivization. After initially emphasizing the “rebellious spontaneity” of such processes, Deleuze...

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