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»The camera is my »exosomatic extension‹.«
»The camera is my »exosomatic extension‹.«

Gertrud Koch, Michael Lüthy, ...

A Walk With Allan Sekula Through His Exhibition

Gertrud Koch: We would like to start by discussing the different narrative forms you have chosen for the titles of your series, like »story«, »fable« or »tale«: how would you differentiate between stories and fables, and what autobiographical narratives are involved here? Is it a kind of metanarrative, is it a composing of different narrative moments?
   Allan Sekula: Very often my titling a particular work has an idiomatic logic: Fish Story has a vernacular resonance, particularly in American English where a...
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News + Events

Storming of the Winter Palace: History as Theater

23.09.2017 – 25.10.2017

Gessnerallee Zürich
Gessnerallee 8
8001 Zürich
Schweiz

Sounds of Resistance: Straub/Huillet/Schoenberg

07.10.2017 – 14.10.2017

Akademie der Künste
Hanseatenweg 10
10557 Berlin
Deutschland

Straub/Huillet: Tell it to the Stones

13.09.2017 – 19.11.2017

Akademie der Künste
Hanseatenweg 10
10557 Berlin
Deutschland

Sergei Eisenstein: The Anthropology of Rhythm

19.09.2017 – 19.01.2018

Nomas Foundation
Viale Somalia 33
01199 Rom
Italien

Anthropocene Lecture: Bruno Latour

29.09.2017, 19:00

Haus der Kulturen der Welt
John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10
10557 Berlin
Deutschland

 

Topics
  • The Subject of Capitalism

    The Subject of Capitalism

    • cognitive capital
    • migration
    • capitalism
    • subjectification
  • Autofiction—Metafiction

    Autofiction—Metafiction

    • fiction
    • memory
    • autobiography
    • autofiction
    • Theory of fiction
  • Color and meaning

    Color and meaning

    Who is afraid of Red, Yellow, Blue…?

    • semiotics and semiology
    • chromatics / colour science
    • monochrome
    • image and imagery
    • color
  • Wissen-Nicht-Wissen

    Wissen-Nicht-Wissen

    • experiment
    • potentiality
    • idleness
    • poetics
    • literary studies
    • ignorance and non-knowledge
    • poetology of knowledge
    • epistemology
    • history of knowledge
    • astonishment
Current Texts

Karen Barad

When two hands touch, how close are they?

When two hands touch, there is a sensuality of the flesh, an exchange of warmth, a feeling of pressure, of presence, a proximity of otherness that brings the other nearly as close as oneself. Perhaps closer. And if the two hands belong to one person, might this not enliven an uncanny sense of the otherness of the self, a literal holding oneself at a distance in the sensation of contact, the greeting of the stranger within? So much happens in a touch: an infinity of others – other beings, other spaces, other times – are aroused.

When two hands touch, how close are they? What is the measure of closeness? Which disciplinary knowledge formations, political parties, religious and cultural traditions, infectious disease authorities, immigration officials, and policy makers do not have a stake in, if not a measured answer to, this question? When touch is at issue, nearly everyone’s hair stands...

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  • material aesthetics
  • materialist turn
  • thing/thingness
  • anthropology
  • materiality
Current Texts

Patricia Ticineto Clough

Hail Mary full of grace. Hail Mary full of grace.

She with my parents, and me left to pray the rosary, counting Hail Marys against the return of some little girl’s jealousy.

The Rosary is a string of beads used to keep count of prayers as they are recited. First given to Saint Dominic by the Blessed Virgin Mary in the 13th century, the rosary would be popularly practiced with spiritual intensity. There also were rosary books, among the earliest vernacular devotional manuals to be printed, thus defining the role of print as a way of shaping and reflecting religious awareness. But the rosary was popular as much among those who could read as those who could not, as indulgences were offered offering a surplus value of grace in exchange simply for the number of prayers that were recited. And with this, a concern arose that the value given to sheer repetition would mix up quantity and quality, spirituality and superstition,...

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  • body
  • gender
  • childhood
  • affects
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Photographs tend to suggest infinity
Photographs tend to suggest infinity

Siegfried Kracauer

The Photographic Approach (1951)

The photographic approach – that is, the effort to utilize the inherent abilities of the camera – is responsible for the particular nature of photographs. In the days of Zola and the Impressionists, the properties of photographs were commonly held to be the hallmarks of art in general; but no sooner did painting and literature break away from realism than these properties assumed an exclusive character. Since they depend upon techniques peculiar to the medium, they have remained stable throughout its evolution....
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  • History of photography
  • photography
  • media theory
  • Siegfried Kracauer
  • film
Current Texts

Diedrich Diederichsen

“is x-ism a y-ism”

The title of this text poses what at first appears to be an irritating, if not completely insane question, that I myself couldn’t have imagined posing a year ago. For one thing, it’s because one of the important terms in this question was totally unknown to me, and for another, I probably would have affirmed it outright had I known what this word meant.

The question is: Is Marxism a correlationism? The rhetoric of this formulation – “is x-ism a y-ism” – borrows from the title of a famous essay by Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism is a Humanism (1946). In those days it was also a matter of setting a new philosophical fashion in relation to a major cornerstone of orientation – to humanism. Today the question appears to be reversed: Is Marxism – which is now the cornerstone, the old orientation – a correlationism? The correlationism isn’t the new fashion, but...

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  • anthropology
  • materiality
  • materialist turn
  • material aesthetics
  • thing/thingness
Current Texts

Philipp Schulte

To Irritate What Is Taken for Granted

“What is critique?” – Michel Foucault dedicated a lecture to this question in 1978. Twenty-two years later, Judith Butler did the same, and presented a detailed analysis and interpretation of Foucault’s text. “What is critique?” – to both theorists, this is the short form of a question that I would like to put this way: How can we develop a “reflected intractability [l’indocilité réfléchie]” in order to desubjugate ourselves and to escape reigning discourses – at least potentially or temporarily? Butler draws our attention to a fascinating aspect of Foucault’s lecture: She points out that it is highly performative. Foucault tries to do what he explains, he rehearses the act of desubjugation. When asked where the decision-making not to be governed comes from, he answers very artfully: “I was not referring to something that would be a fundamental anarchism, that would be like an originary freedom, absolutely and wholeheartedly resistant to any governmentalization....

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