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»The camera is my »exosomatic extension‹.«
»The camera is my »exosomatic extension‹.«

Gertrud Koch, Michael Lüthy, ...

A Walk With Allan Sekula Through His Exhibition

Gertrud Koch: We would like to start by discussing the different narrative forms you have chosen for the titles of your series, like »story«, »fable« or »tale«: how would you differentiate between stories and fables, and what autobiographical narratives are involved here? Is it a kind of metanarrative, is it a composing of different narrative moments?
   Allan Sekula: Very often my titling a particular work has an idiomatic logic: Fish Story has a vernacular resonance, particularly in American English where a...
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  • exhibition
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  • Allan Sekula
Current Texts

Jean-Luc Nancy

Des zétrangers des zah des zuh

Etrange extraneus du dehors pas du dedans (intraneus) pas de la maison unheimlich pas du heim pas du foyer de l’autre côté des portes – fores, foreigner pas dans le rythme en trop, odd pas régulier pas ordinaire rare singulier seltsam bizarre besherat vaillant élégant fantasque tordu verschroben de travers surprenant extraordinaire étonnant

 

C’est étonnant comme nous sommes riches en mots formes façons pour tourner autour de l’étrange étranger de l’ausländer hors du pays pas « pays avec nous » comme on disait jadis en France « c’est un pays à moi » pour dire quelqu’un de mon village de mon coin ma province mon bled

 

Riches à profusion pour tout ce qui n’est pas proche et propre, approprié, convenant, mitmenschlich ce qui ne fait pas mitdasein

 

Parce qu’on présuppose que mit avec with est consistant, plein, solide et solidaire et ce qui est without avecsans mitohne avec hors ou hors d’avec la proximité

 

Mais avec même proche exige...

Current Texts

Andreas L. Hofbauer

The yoke of being, noteworthy dis-position

It wasn’t nature and its dangers that forced domestication and enabled the economic shrine. Temple and funerary cult, sacrifice and distribution of the meat—for Homer all sacrificial animals were still hieria, holy creatures—and the containment of wildness led to symbolic and socio-cultural change, which became the vector and motor of sedentary, food-producing communities. It wasn’t sheep, goats, or cattle that were domesticated first; it was the zoon logon echon itself that bowed to the self-created yoke of the cult. Why, we don’t know. Beyond this it’s important that unlike plants only very few species of animal can be domesticated, and that this shouldn’t be confused with taming. Economic significance develops as an epiphenomenon. It transforms from possible human sacrifice to animal sacrifice to the distribution of meat in early “Greek” antiquity, then to the obeloi (skewers with varying amounts of meat, as tokens for the priests’ or judges’ portion; even...

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  • economization
  • money
  • ethnology
  • anthropology

 

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Le texte inconnu est une promesse

Michele Pedrazzi

Le texte inconnu est une promesse

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  • word processing
  • media theory
  • music
  • linguistics
  • reading
  • electronic music

 

“Every human body is an old civilization”
“Every human body is an old civilization”

Susanne Witzgall

“Every human body is an old civilization”

Susanne Witzgall: One common point in your texts in that both of you describe migration as an incomplete process, as a practice that is not completed with the arrival at the destination, but perhaps even only finds its starting point, its beginning, there. For instance, you Christian Kravagna, have written in your essay that many migrants develop a practice of travelling back and forth, almost like commuting, a process in which there is no definitive home that one can return...
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Humanity is a metahuman concept.

Rolf Bossart, Milo Rau

Humanity is a metahuman concept.

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  • realism
  • art theory
  • re-enactment
  • artistic practice
  • postmodernism
  • transhumanism
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Marcus Quent

Belief in the world is what we most lack.

It was Gilles Deleuze who in various contexts underlined that what we most lacked was “belief in the world.” The odd remark appears, for example, in a conversation in 1990 with the Italian Marxist Antonio Negri about revolutionary emergence and the political force of minorities. In this dialogue Negri examines his interlocutor’s thought in the light of the “problem of the political,” which connects the various stages of the philosopher’s intellectual biography. Deleuze’s remark here is the reprise of a motif that would be familiar to readers of his second book on cinema, which appeared in 1985, in which Deleuze contends that the “power of modern cinema” is based on its ability to “give us back” our lost “belief in the world.”

At the end of the conversation Negri asks his dialogue partner about the possibility of present-day processes of subjectivization. After initially emphasizing the “rebellious spontaneity” of such processes, Deleuze...

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