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The Moses complex’s place is exile.
The Moses complex’s place is exile.

Ute Holl

Introduction

The unkind and inhuman God of Moses in Exodus reveals himself as a terrifying media agent. This is why the Moses figure insistently returns in the arts and sciences of the twentieth century. It corresponds to the fact that the media initially remain concealed when new laws come in with them. When Moses climbs the mountain, the tablets on which the caesuras of writing will turn out to be there already, while the people are still camping in the desert,...
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  • exile
  • Jean-Marie Straub
  • Arnold Schönberg
  • community
  • Danièle Huillet
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Humanity is a metahuman concept.

Rolf Bossart, Milo Rau

Humanity is a metahuman concept.

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  • re-enactment
  • postmodernism
  • art theory
  • transhumanism
  • realism
  • artistic practice

The Storming of the Winter Palace
The Forensics of an Image

24.11.2017 – 08.04.2018

HMKV im Dortmunder U
Leonie-Reygers-Terrasse
44137 Dortmund
Deutschland

Straub/Huillet: Tell it to the Stones

13.09.2017 – 19.11.2017

Akademie der Künste
Hanseatenweg 10
10557 Berlin
Deutschland

Sergei Eisenstein: The Anthropology of Rhythm

19.09.2017 – 19.01.2018

Nomas Foundation
Viale Somalia 33
01199 Rom
Italien

 

Current Texts

Mark B. N. Hansen

Affectivity as Environmental Force

In contemporary developments in biomedia and digital computing, technicity opens the domain of the superempirical to experimentation and in this respect can be seen to contribute directly to the genesis of affectivity well beyond the affect-body-emotion complex. In the age of biotechnical convergence, the key issue is not “what bodies can be made to do,” as Clough puts it, but rather what matter is. Here we come upon the true significance of Clough’s insistence on the technicity of affect and its centrality for extending affect to the “dynamism of matter generally”: far from being a merely instrumental mediation that operates to produce affect or to give access to affect produced in something else, technicity operates within material fluxes themselves. It is an internal element in material processes that are themselves affective. What is needed then, to expand affectivity beyond bodily matter and bodily agency, is an account of technicity that...

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  • epistemology
  • emotions
  • Alfred North Whitehead
  • affects
  • gender
Current Texts

Friedrich Balke

Fiction and the Possibility of Historic Events

Should historiography beat history – social, cultural, or even media histories – into shapes that fit a principle determining the possibility or impossibility of objects, mentalities and events? To deal with this question, I refer to Jacques Rancière’s considerations presented in his 1997 lecture titled “The Trouble with Ana.” Rancière first developed the same argument in his 1992 book The Names of History. To me, this is still one of his most interesting books, productive as it is for the histories of cultures and sciences, even though it does not yet deal with aesthetic regimes or disagreement (mésentente). My own thoughts on the matter touch upon the question of the political in so far as they concern the relation between names or words and the places or “spaces” in which they appear. For as Rancière pointed out later in Disagreement, “Political activity is whatever shifts a body from the place assigned to...

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  • name
  • History
  • history of media
  • historiography

 

Epistemologies, Aesthetics, Politics
Epistemologies, Aesthetics, Politics

Marie-Luise Angerer (ed.), Bernd Bösel (ed.), ...

Timing of Affect

For many years now, the time of affect has been a major issue in the humanities, sciences, art and media. Affect stands here for feelings, emotions, processes of affection, for movements of the bodies, for a missing time – with one word: for a broad range of ideas and discursive contexts and histories. Timing of Affect assembles contributions from different disciplines – from philosophy to film, music, sound, media and art, through to technology, computation and neurology – to explore...
  • body
  • affects
  • media theory
  • epistemology
  • aesthetics
Current Texts

Simon Critchley

The world is shit.

We are living through a long anti-1960s. The various anti-capitalist experiments in communal living and collective existence that defined that period seem to us either quaintly passé, laughably unrealistic or dangerously misguided. Having grown up and thrown off such seemingly childish ways, we now think we know better than to try and bring heaven crashing down to earth and construct concrete utopias. To that extent, despite our occasional and transient enthusiasms and Obamaisms, we are all political realists; indeed most of us are passive nihilists and cynics. This is why we still require a belief in something like original sin, namely that there is something ontologically defective about what it means to be human. The Judaeo-Christian conception of original sin finds its modern analogues in Freud’s variation on the Schopenhauerian disjunction between desire and civilization, Heidegger’s ideas of facticity and fallenness and the Hobbesian anthropology that drives Carl Schmitt’s defense...

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  • politics
  • contemporary art
  • activism
  • community
  • art
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Luciana Parisi

Intensive thought, randomness, dynamism

As depicted in the movie Elysium, in the near-future scenario of 2124, data will not simply be processed by machines or by brains but rather exchanged across brains by means of machines. Elysium is a self-sustainable, pollution-free space habitat that lives off the underclass work of a derelict planet earth, overpopulated and deranged, with a dying human species. In this scenario, machines cannot think and rather seem to be simply instrumental to human-oriented intentions (exposing a traditional moral puzzle of the battle of good versus evil, which is ultimately ascribed to voluntary decisions). Whilst appearing to be mere channels of governance, machines constitute the computational infrastructure of Elysium, whose operations are precisely neutral: unable to understand the cause of things and thus devoid of will (since the AI probe parole officer cannot interpret Max’s allusive comments and jokes, it says to him: “Do you want to speak to a human?”)....

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  • affects
  • automatic life
  • epistemology
  • Alfred North Whitehead
  • automation